Hope Index, Vol. 4: Laughter & Criticism

Hope Index, Vol. 4: Laughter & Criticism

Whew. Thankful to all of you for making it another week of soul-stirring, hope-renewing enthusiasm thanks to our community at Upwrite. August 1st will mark our little digital publication's first month anniversary (and as we all remember from high school relationships, the first month anniversary is by far the most romantic and eagerly celebrated of them all.) We'll be releasing some details next week about the exciting stuff we plan to do to celebrate, so please stay tuned for that. For now, I've rounded up some links: mundane, hilarious, thoughtful; all related to the literary community at large, as well as a speech about hope that we could probably all use after that RNC apocalypse. Cheers to the weekend! 

  • If you're into literary criticism... congratulations, welcome to the wasteland where most nerds don't dare to tread. It's good to have some company. On the bright side, LitHub put together a list of some of the best new litcrit titles being published this year and you can find half of the list at this link.  Who says criticism is just for mean girls?  
  • If you're into books that will make you laugh instead of wrinkle your brow, this round-up by Booklist incorporates a a Michael Scott gif with some David Sedaris links and Caitlin Moran's table of contents from her book, How to Be a Woman. I think the fact that I laughed reading it is a good indicator. 
  • Emily Anderson's insightful look back at the psychology of Little House on the Prairie will ring familiar to those that hold Laura & co. dear, as well as the many stoic and suppressed emotions that many of us relate to in those books. While there is a delicate interplay of balance between over-expressing our pain and letting it silently kill us, the idea that these books give us an entry into that conversation at all is a new one. Worth a read. 
  • That Trump speech last night got you down? This TED talk  by Sherwin Nutland, a writer and surgeon, might be music to your ears. Social responsibility, "enlightened self-interest" and the the fact that there will still exist tomorrow, and the next day, a love of humankind -- despite whatever screaming pundits might want you to believe. My favorite part: 
So, here we are. We are, should be, morally committed to being the healer of the world. And we have had examples over and over and over again -- you've just heard one in the last 15 minutes -- of people who have not only had that commitment, but had the charisma, the brilliance -- and I think in this room it's easy to use the word brilliant, my God -- the brilliance to succeed at least at the beginning of their quest,and who no doubt will continue to succeed, as long as more and more of us enlist ourselves in their cause.

The world will not be saved by the Internet, y'all. But it's still so nice to have you here with us.  

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