Hope Index, Vol. 15: Your Tired, Your Poor, Your Maps Full of Women

Hope Index, Vol. 15: Your Tired, Your Poor, Your Maps Full of Women

Relax, there's no map content here.  Or is there? 

It was a week of colored-in states, third party candidates, triggers that turned into terrors, and our American life broken apart and on display in gory detail.  I don't want to make you a map, or a meme of a map, or a meme of a meme of a map. I just want to sit here drinking my thrice-microwaved coffee, eating a soft cookie (S'mores tho) and share some hope with you. Links ahead. 

Brooklyn Magazine featured this article by Rachel Syme as part of their series on the music of the United States, and it is so pretty. Syme recognizes the vacillating tensions of being both of New York and resisting the urge to identify with it completely; the surge of familiar that comes from moving back to the place where your grandmother is from; the aching nostalgia of songs that are about one part of your life, but not about the rest of it. Come for the heart, stay for the music. 

We've established that New York doesn't love you -- though loving it despite its hardship is part of the lure of living here, for many that understand the guts of the great city. The New Yorker has a great short essay by Rebecca Solnit about her new book and one of the maps inside, called "City of Women." The New York City subway map reimagined in terms of the determined, far-from-delicate women that created this city felt like a rallying cry toward resilience. 

And in that same the vein of women we admire: There's not a book we're more excited about than the upcoming Coffee and Crumbs book.  It's one of our favorite sites, and we feel personal alignment with the carefully crafted essays that they publish. Writer Ashlee Gadd shared this post on her personal blog about what it's like to be on the verge of publishing something with her signature combination of honesty and charm. 

Sometimes a physical relocation can enormously impact our socio-economic circumstances. That's what happened to Dorcas Cheng-Tozun. Her eye-opening opinion piece in Christianity Today sheds light on the truth that it is possible to be both privileged and underprivileged at the same time. "Like power," Cheng-Tozun remarks, "[privilege] is not something to despise, but to use wisely." Though we seem to have reached the crux of the debate about female empowerment, the issue of privilege cannot be discounted as we consider our debt to those around us. 

The discussion about reading, internet citizenship and how arts and culture are evolving to keep up is moving at lightening speed, and we are doing our best here at Upwrite to keep up. This means change ahead for the magazine and its writers -- we think you're gonna like it. Announcements soon come, but until them:  count up your demons, turn off the Coldplay and remember that October is beautiful. And thank you always, sincerely, for reading. 

Post-script: If you feel like you can read any more about Donald Trump (which...you really don't have to), there is hope to be found in this piece about the South's progressive awakening, and this op-ed which we absolutely cannot share enough, everyone should read it and share it and quote it and share it again, about the evangelical reaction to Donald Trump and how it should evolve in light of recent events.  

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